THE AMERICAN IRIS SOCIETY

A nonprofit institution incorporated Feb. 2, 1 927, in the County of Philadelphia, State of Pennsylvania. By the terms of the Charter, the Corporation has no stockholders and exists for the sole purpose of promoting the culture and improvement of the IRIS.

OFFICERS

President: Ronald Mullin, Route 3, Box 84, Pawnee, OK 74058

First Vice President: James Rasmussen, 2112 West 17th, Wichita, KS 67203

Second Vice President: Kenneth M. Waite, 6 Tow Path Lane, Westfield, MA 01085

Secretary: Mrs. Larry D. Stayer, 7414 E. 60th St., Tulsa, OK 74145

Treasurer: Francesca Thoolen, 255 Manzanita Dr., Orinda, CA 94563

Editor: Keith Keppel, PO. Box 8173, Stockton, CA 95208

Registrar: Kay Nelson, PO. Box 37613, Omaha, NE 68137

Membership Secretary: Carol Ramsey, 6518 Beachy Ave., Wichita, KS 67206

Recording Secretary: Claire B. Barr, 12565 Cloudesly Drive, San Diego, CA 92128

Publication Sales Director: Jaymie Heathcock, Rt. 3, Box 270, Vinita, OK 74301

DIRECTORS

Past Presidents: Marion Walker, Leon Wolford, Harold L. Stahly

Terms expiring in 1986: Terms expiring in 1987: Terms expiring in 1988:

Claire B. Barr James G. Burch Glenn F. Corlew Jeane Stayer Hilda Crick Catherine Long Gates

James Rasmussen Kenneth M. Waite Phillip Williams Mrs. C. C. Rockwell Jr. James Copeland Walter Machulak

CHAIRMEN OF STANDING COMMITTEES

Affiliates: James A. Copeland, 34165 C. R. 652, Mattawan, Ml 49071, Tel. (616) 668-2156

Awards: Kenneth M. Waite, 6 Tow Path Ln., Westfield, MA 01085

Convention Liaison: Glenn F. Corlew, 2988 Cherry Lane, Walnut Creek, CA 94596

Exhibitions: James Burch, Box 10003, 717 Pratt Ave., NE, Huntsville, AL 35801

Foundation Liaison: Richard Pettijohn, 2510 S. 148 Ave., Omaha, NE 68144

Historical: Larry Harder, 208 First St., PO. Box 278, Ponca, NE 68770

Honorary Awards: Dr. Harold L. Stahly, 8343 Manchester Drive, Grand Blanc, Ml 48439

Judges Handbook Revision: Phil Williams, P.O. Box 41, Eagleville, TN 37060

Judges Training and Judges: Hilda Crick, Route 4, Lewisburg, TN 37091 . Tel. (615) 359-1885

Membership Contest: Rev. Everette Lineberger, Rt. 6, Box 300, Inman, SC 29349

Policy: James Rasmussen, 21 12 West 17th, Wichita, KS 67203

Public Relations: Olive Rice, 1914 Napa Ave., Berkeley, CA 94707

Registrations: Keith Keppel, P.O. Box 8173, Stockton, CA 95208. Send all registration applications and $5.00 payable to AIS, to registrar Kay Nelson, P.O. Box 37613, Omaha, NE 68137 Robins: Janice Badger, 6202 Champion Road - Rt. 2, Chattanooga, TN 37416 RVP Counselor: Walter A. Machulak, S. 82 W. 12877 Acker Drive, Muskego, Wl 53150 Scientific: Dr. Currier McEwen, Rt. 1, Box 818, S. Harpswell, ME 04079 Section Liaison: James Rasmussen, 2112 W. 17th, Wichita, KS 67203 Slides: W. G. Sindt, 14252 15th St. South, Alton, MN 55001 Test Gardens: Bennett Jones, 5635 SW Boundary St. , Portland, OR 97221 Youth: Catherine Long Gates, 3033 Jefferson, Boulder, CO 80302

BULLETIN OF THE

y AMERICAN IRIS SOCIETY _

VOL. L)Q/HCNO- 4 Series No. 263 October, 1 986

ISSN 0747-4172

Editor-in-Chief: Keith Keppel, P.O. Box 8173, Stockton, CA 95208 Tel. (209) 463-0227

Associate Editors: Joe Gatty, 451 N. Lillian, Stockton, CA 95205

Philip Edinger, P.O. Box 637, Cloverdale, CA 95425 Advertising Editor: Kay Nelson, P.O. Box 37613, Omaha, NE 68137

Tel. (402) 895-9112

Managing Editor: Phillip Williams, P.O. Box 41, Eagleville, TN 37060 International News: Bee Warburton, 2 Warburton Lane, Westboro, MA

01581

Photo Coordinator: Maryann Anning, 1 2864 Viscaino Road, Los Altos Hills,

CA 94022

THE BULLETIN is published quarterly by the American Iris Society. Publishing Office 7414 E. 60th St., Tulsa, OK 74145. Second-class postage paid at Tulsa, OK, and at additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included in annual membership dues of $9.50. Annual Subscription rate $9.50 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE AMERICAN IRIS SOCIETY, 7414 East 60th Street, Tulsa, OK 74145.

Communications concerning membership and dues should be addressed to Carol Ramsey, 6518 Beachy Ave., Wichita, KS 67206.

Communications concerning the business matters of the Society should be addressed to Jeane Stayer, 7414 E. 60th Street, Tulsa, OK 74145.

Communications regarding advertising should be addressed to Kay Nelson, Advertising Editor. For Information about membership, advertising rates and section dues, see Table of Contents.

All copy due in Editor’s office by Oct. 15(Jan.), Jan. 15(April), April 15(July), July 15(October). This BULLETIN was printed by Williams Printing Company.

SECTION PRESIDENTS AND BULLETIN REPRESENTATIVES

MEDIAN IRIS SOCIETY: Jayne Ritchie, 24646-1 80th Ave. SE, Kent, WA 98042, Larry Harder, Ponca, NE 68770

THE SOCIETY FOR SIBERIAN IRISES: James J. Foreman, 1360 W. Michaels Rd„ Tipp City, OH 45371 ; Carolee Clay, Way land Academy, Box 398, Beaver Dam, Wl 53916 SPURIA IRIS SOCIETY: Ray M. John, 1004 Springfield, Fort Worth, TX 76112; Floyd W. Wick- enkamp, 10521 Bell arose Dr., Sun City, AZ 85351 SOCIETY FOR JAPANESE IRISES: Dr. Currier McEwen, Rt. 1, Box 818, S. Harpswell, ME 04079;

Leland M. Welsh, 7979 W. “D” Ave., Kalamazoo, Ml 49009 REBLOOMING IRIS SOCIETY: Virginia Mathews, 315 S. Grandview Ct. , Stillwater, OK 74074, LJoyd Zurbrigg, 708 Noblin St., Radford, VA 24141

DWARF IRIS SOCIETY: Carl H. Boswell, 1821 Gross Lane, Concord, CA 94519: David B. Sindt, 1331 W. Cornelia, Chicago, IL 60657

SOCIETY FOR PACIFIC COAST NATIVE IRISES: Duane Meek, 1373 Coventry Road, Concord, CA 94518; Joseph B. Grant II, 1479 Hopkins St., Berkeley, CA 94702 SPECIES IRIS GROUP OF NORTH AMERICA (SIGNA): Chairman, Elaine Hulbert, Rt. 3, Box 57, Floyd, VA 24091

LOUISIANA IRIS SOCIETY OF AMERICA (LISA): Melody Wilhoit, Rt. 1 , Box 1 41 , Kansas, IL 61933;

Dr. Robert Bledsoe, 2024 S. First Ave., Sioux Falls, SD 57105 COOPERATING SOCIETY: Aril Society International: William Scott, 1946 Vedanta Place, Holly¬ wood, CA 90068

1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1986 AIS Awards . 6

Golden State Reunion

San Jose, 1986 .

. . Ronn Dunn .

. ... 17

Melrose Gardens .

. . Perry Dyer .

. ... 19

Keppel-Gatty Garden . . .

. . Everette Lineberger .

. ... 27

Bay View Gardens .

. . Jean Morris .

. ... 30

Coleman Garden .

. . Carol Lankow .

. ... 34

Dabel Garden .

. . Jess Ouintana, Roy Krug

. ... 40

Maryott Garden .

. . Terry Aitken .

. ... 44

Petermeier Garden .

. . Sigrid Asmus, Greg Hastings. 48

Williamson Garden .

. . Mary Bruner .

. ... 50

Convention Cup Winners

. ... 53

Favorite Guest Irises . . . .

. ... 54

1987 Phoenix Convention Registration

Information .

. ... 56

Fiesta Phoenix ’87 .

. . Carroll Elmore .

. ... 60

Progressive Attitudes in Judging .

. . Brian Clough .

. ... 64

Computers in Irisdom .

. . Stephen Wells .

. ... 67

Regular Features

President’s Page .

. 3

International News .

. . . 78

Slides for Rent .

. 5

1986 Awards, Florence . . .

. . . 79

Bulletin Board .

.... 70

1985 Awards, Vienna . . . .

. . . 80

Advertising Rates .

.... 70

Board Minutes, April 1986 . .

. . . 80

Membership Rates .

.... 72

In. Memoriam .

. . . 86

Youth Views .

. 73

Gifts to AIS .

. . . 86

Flight Lines .

.... 74

Photo Credits .

. . . 96

Advertisers

Burrows, Nancy .

.... 72

Society for Siberian Irises . . .

. . . . 4

Evergreen Labels .

.... 66

Sooner State Iris Society . . .

. . . . 4

Schultz Co .

.... 77

Commercial Directory .

88-96

Cover: SONG OF NORWAY, 1986 Dykes Medal Winner. Photo by Keppel.

2

From the Desk of the President

Ron Mullin

Everyone is familiar with the saying that time flies when you are having fun. It’s definitely true. It hardly seems possible that this is the last of my presiden¬ tial messages. The time has passed quickly and it was certainly a fun time for me.

During the past three years I have visited many clubs across the country. Those clubs are the backbone of The American Iris Society, so their con¬ tinued success is most important. I have noted that the clubs which are doing the best are those in which harmony prevails. A positive attitude seems to be a part of every member’s outlook, and that is what we should try to achieve in every club. Accent the positive in your local club and in AIS.

Our membership continues to grow, and some regions are doing par¬ ticularly well in recruiting new members. Let’s not forget that those new members need to be helped along by those with more experience in growing irises and in club activities. Make that new member a permanent one by giving encouragement and by being friendly.

The Board of Directors will be meeting in Tulsa this fall. Remember that you are always welcome at meetings of the board. At this meeting the new president will take office. I know that he can count on the same wonderful spirit of cooperation which has made my three years so pleasant.

AIS will again sell calendars during 1987. This venture proved to be quite popular during 1986, and as further work is done in this area, the calendar will become better and better. All the other items which were requested by the membership during recent years are now available too. This includes the Judges’ Handbook, RVP Handbook, Color Fans, the 1969 Checklist, and the Convention Handbook. The directors should be commended for their efforts in getting these items completed and made available.

The super-active San Fernando Valley Iris Society continued its scholarship program this year and presented the awards at one of their meetings. In addition, they honored Mr. Marion Walker, former AIS President, with an Honorary Life Membership in their club. It was my pleasure to be present for these festivities and at meetings in Utah and Lubbock, Texas. It is apparent

3

that hard garden work is a necessity for irisarians, since all of us tend to eat at every meeting.

Writing these messages has never been easy, and this last one is the most difficult of all. It is not possible for me to express my gratitude to the members of the society for the many kindnesses extended to me during my term. I’ve met many people that I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to meet had I not held this office. And, it is the people who make this organization what it is. When one presidential term ends and another begins, the work of the society goes on because thousands of members will continue working as they always have. Thank you, members, for allowing me to serve you as president.

ATTENTION HYBRIDIZERS

The Sooner State Iris Society is pleased to announce the Seventh Annual

POLLEN DAUBERS’ SEMINAR

February 27-28, 1987

JOSEPH K. MERTZWEILLER

has accepted an invitation to lead sessions on hybridizing for both established and budding future hybridizers. The sessions will focus on the LOUISIANA iris. A fee of $20.00 per person will he charged (February 28 session only). The session on February 27 is free. For further information and assistance, write:

Dr. William E. Jones

2312 Butternut Place, Edmond, OK 73013 Phone: 1-405-478-3498 or come at 7:30 PM. on the 27th to:

Will Rogers Garden Center 3400 NW 36 St., Oklahoma City

SIBERIAN IRISES . . . Postpaid $7.00

By Currier McEwen; illustrated with color plates, drawings and monochrome; includes glossary of terms; prepared with help from committee of advisors and contributors from The Society for Siberian Irises. Proceeds from sale of books will be used to support the work of SSL

Send order to: Julius Wadekamper, 15974 Canby Avenue, Route 5, Faribault, MN 55021. Make cheek payable to Society for Siberian Irises.

4

IRIS SLIDES FOR RENT

AIS and Sections of AIS maintain sets of iris slides which may be rented. Each set contains about 100 35-mm slides.

SLIDE SETS AVAILABLE

Irises for Every Garden Good for garden clubs. Contains both bearded and beardless types.

The New Reliables Popular, less expensive varieties.

Recent Award Winners-— AM and HM winners The Newest in Irises— Recent introductions The Popularity Poll 100 favorite TBs Arrangements Flower arrangements featuring irises

Irises in the Visual Arts European, Oriental, and American paintings, arts and crafts that include irises

Many Types and Colors of Irises Bearded, bulbous, beardless in their great variety

Irises through the Seasons Follows the iris around the calendar in house and garden

The other Bearded Irises— Other than TB. Dwarfs, Medians, Arils, Arilbreds

St. Louis Convention— 1981

Denver Convention 1 982

Boston Convention 1983

Seattle Convention— 1 984

Indianapolis Convention 1985

San Jose Convention— 1986

Phoenix Convention— 1 987 (after July 1)

Order above slides from Howard Shockey

461 1 Rio Grande Ln. NW Check to AIS Albuquerque, NM 87107

Phone (505) 345-01 1 9 24 hour answering recorder

THE FOLLOWING ARE SECTIONS OF AIS

Arils and Arilbreds— Order from Clay H. Osborne, 16789 Spring Creek Rd., Applegate, CA 95703, April 1 5 through October 1 4, and 47806 Fiesta, Indio, CA 92201 , October 15 through April 14. Check to Aril Iris Society.

Dwarfs— Good for rock gardens. Order from Dorothy Willott, 26231 Shaker Blvd., Beechwood, OH 44122. Check to DIS

Japanese Order from John Coble, 9823 E. Michigan Ave., Galesburg, Ml 49053. Check to Japanese Iris Society.

Louisianas Order from LaVera Burkett, 1 100 N. Ella Street, Searcy, AR 72143 Check to USA.

Medians— Standard Dwarf, Intermediate, Miniature Tall Bearded, Border Bearded.

Order from Terry Aitken, 608 N.W. 1 19th. St., Vancouver, WA 98685. Check to MIS. Species— Suitable for judges’ training. Order from Colin Rigby, 2087 Curtis Drive, Penngrove, CA 94951 . Check to SIGNA.

Siberians Order from James Foreman, 1370 W. Michaels Rd., Tipp City, OH 45371. Please write for details before ordering.

Spurias— Order from Marilyn Holloway, 673 Acacia Ave., Sacramento, CA 95815. Check to Spuria Iris Society.

TO ORDER Request slides well in advance, preferable six weeks. Cost is $5.00 per set. Slides must be returned next day by first class/priority mail. Affiliated societies may have one free program per year, although some Sections may not honor this.

5

1986 AIS AWARDS

DYKES MEMORIAL MEDAL

SONG OF NORWAY (W. Luihn) 200 votes (28.4%)

runnersup

COPPER CLASSIC (E. Roderick) 57 votes LACED COTTON (Schreiners) 37 votes

votes

KNOWLTON MEDAL (BB)

292 PINK BUBBLES (B. Hager) runnersup

50 DOLL BABY (G. Corlew)

47 SOMETHING SPECIAL (B. Hager)

SASS MEDAL (IB)

215 RARE EDITION (J. Gatty) runnersup

162 AZ AP (A. Ensiminger)

63 OKLAHOMA BANDIT (H. Nichols)

COOK-DOUGLAS MEDAL (SDB)

112 RAIN DANCE (B. Jones) runnersup

63 LITTLE BLACK BELT (D. Niswonger)

62 BRASS TACKS (K. Keppel)

CAPARNE-WELCH MEDAL (SDB)

71 GARNET ELF (M. Hamblen) runnersup

67 PENNY CANDY (M. Hamblen) 59 NUGGETS (D. Sindt)

MORGAN-WOOD MEDAL (SIB)

116 BUTTER AND SUGAR (C. McEwen)

runnersup

68 STEVE VARNER (H. Briscoe) 61 RUFFLED VELVET

(C. McEwen)

DEBAILLON MEDAL (LA)

190 ANN CHOWNING (F. Chowning)

runnersup

50 CLARA GOULA (C. Arny)

30 EASTER TIDE (C. Arny)

C. G. WHITE AWARD (AR)

25 KHYBER PASS (K. Kidd)

runnersup

15 MOHR PRETENDER (L. Rich)

13 COOL OASIS (B. Hager)

MOHR AWARD (AB)

31 SMOKE WITH WINE (C. Boswell)

runnersup

26 HUMOHR (B. Hager)

26 PHOPHETIC MESSAGE

(H. Nichols)

NIES AWARD (SPU)

24 BETTY COOPER (E. McCown)

runnersup

22 REDWOOD SUPREME (D. Niswonger)

20 ELEANOR HILL (B. Hager)

20 VINTAGE YEAR (D. Niswonger)

MITCHELL AWARD (CA)

16 BIG WHEEL (J. Ghio)

runnersup

14 SIMPLY WILD (J. Ghio)

12 CALIFORNIA MYSTIQUE

(J. Ghio)

6

PINK BUBBLES RAIN DANCE

RARE EDITION

BUTTER AND SUGAR

GARNET ELF

ANN CHOWNING

7

SMOKE WITH WINE

BETTY COOPER

ROSEMARY’S DREAM

BIG WHEEL

AACHEN ELF

KHYBER PASS

8

WILLIAMSON-WHITE AWARD (MTR)

45 ROSEMARY’S DREAM (M. Dunderman) runnersup

35 PUPPY LOVE (B. Hager)

20 CONCORD SPRITE (C. Boswell)

WALTHER CUP (Most HM votes— All categories) AACHEN ELF (MTB) (L. Kennedy)

1 39 votes

runnersup

GIGOLO (TB) (K. Keppel) 130 votes EVERYTHING PLUS (TB)

(D. Niswonger) 107 votes

PAYNE AWARD (JAP)

Due to extended deadline for voting, results will be reported in the January Bulletin.

THEATRE

BUBBLING OVER

CAPRICIOUS

MULLED WINE

9

AWARD OF MERIT

votes

TALL BEARDED

190 MULLED WINE (K. Keppel)

188 BUBBLING OVER (J. Ghio)

104 THEATRE (K. Keppel)

95 WEDDING CANDLES (Schreiners)

86 COLOR CODED (D. Rawlins) 80 INFINITE GRACE (M. Hamblen)

77 SPECTACULAR BID (D. Denney)

76 MASTER TOUCH (Schreiners) 73 SKY HOOKS (M. Osborne)

72 CAPRICIOUS (M. Hambien)

67 POPS CONCERT (K. Waite)

66 FRESNO FROLIC (J. Weiler)

runnersup

63 MARMALADE (K. Keppel)

63 LIGHTED WITHIN (R. Blodgett)

62 DESERT ECHO (D. Meek)

59 AN-JAN (L. Bellagamba)

59 SHAMAN (S. DuBose)

58 BEYOND (J. Gibson)

58 CRACKLIN’ BURGUNDY (Schreiners)

56 PRAY FOR PEACE (G. Plough)

INTERMEDIATE

BEARDED

107 BOLD PRINT (J. Gatty)

66 BEDTIME STORY (J. Ritchie)

64 RASPBERRY ROSE (M. Hamblen)

runnersup

44 SARANAP (C. Boswell)

40 COUNTRY DEEJAY (C. Lankow)

38 IN THE BUFF (R. Sobek)

38 LOOKIN’ GOOD (B. Hager)

BORDER BEARDED

129 HOPSCOTCH (K. Keppel)

97 PREDICTION (K. Keppel)

69 LADYBUG (M. Hamblen)

runnersup

60 FEATHERED FRIEND (A. Ensminger)

55 INTYGREYSHUN (A. Ensminger)

50 IRIS BONSACK (A. Ensminger) 44 CINDER BRITCHES (D. Meek)

STANDARD DWARF BEARDED

73 LITTLE EPISODE (D. Rawlins) 54 JADE MIST (P. Dyer)

51 AZURE GEM (M. Hamblen)

48 BABY BLESSED (L. Zurbrigg)

runnersup

45 STARLIGHT WALTZ (C. Helsley)

42 KAYO (D. Niswonger)

40 THRICE BLESSED (J. Weiler) 36 FIRE ONE (G. Plough)

MINIATURE DWARF BEARDED 48 DITTO (B. Hager)

39 TWIST OF LEMON (R. & L. Miller)

37 ALPINE LAKE (A. & D. Willott)

runnersup

35 SHRIMP (D. Sindt)

33 BETTY EMMONS (C. Palmer) 32 PUSSY TOES (A. & D. Willott) 29 GOLD CANARY (A. & D. Willott)

10

POPS CONCERT

INFINITE GRACE

i H

COLOR CODED

FRESNO FROLIC

WEDDING CANDLES SKY HOOKS

11

SIBERIAN

54 FROSTY RIM (G. Bush)

53 SHIRLEY POPE (C. McEwen) 52 JAYBIRD (B. Hager)

runnersup

48 DEAR DIANNE (C. McEwen) 36 OMAR’S CUP (B. Hager)

34 NEW WINE (S. Varner)

33 MAGGIE SMITH (W. McGarvey)

LOUISIANA

49 BLACK GAMECOCK (F. Chowning)

40 ACADIAN MISS (C. Arny)

40 MARY’S CHARLIE (M. Dunn)

runnersup

33 COLORIFIC (J. Mertzweiller) 33 VALERA (C. Arny)

32 SHRIMP LOUIS (B. Hager)

31 PRESIDENT HEDLEY (J. Mertzweiller)

BOLD PRINT

ACADIAN MISS

FROSTY RIM

MARY’S CHARLIE

n

12

HONORABLE MENTION

TALL BEARDED

votes

130 GIGOLO (K. Keppel)

107 EVERYTHING PLUS (D. Niswonger)

99 PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE (Schreiners)

96 KAREN (M. Hamblen)

93 TOMORROW’S CHILD (B. Blyth by Keppel)

91 SYNCOPATION (J. Gatty)

89 OLYMPIAD (J. Ghio)

74 CRYSTAL CATHEDRAL (B. Hager by Maryott)

64 NAVAJO JEWEL (J. Weiler)

56 JUST MARRIED (J. Ghio)

55 MARAUDER (J. Ghio)

55 RASPBERRY FRILLS (Schreiners)

53 DANGER (J. Gatty)

52 CLASSICO (L. Gartman)

49 LADY MADONNA (Schreiners) 49 SOPHISTICATION (M. Hamblen)

48 BLACK FLAG (H. Stahly)

48 ORANGE CELEBRITY (D. Niswonger)

47 BUBBLY MOOD (J. Ghio)

44 BAMA BERRY (J. Burch)

44 LATIN ROCK (Schreiners)

43 TWICE THRILLING (M. Osborne)

42 MOMENT IN TIME (Ev. Kegerise)

42 NEEDLEPOINT (Schreiners) 40 CANDELERO (G. Corlew)

40 HAIDA DANCER (T. Aitken)

39 PEKING SUMMER (Schreiners)

38 LAREDO (K. Keppel)

37 IMMORTALITY (L. Zurbrigg) 37 MING ROSE (O. Brown)

36 OH BABE (D. Anderson)

36 WAR SAILS (Schreiners)

35 SILVER FLOW (B. Hager)

34 PERFECT INTERLUDE (Schreiners)

34 POET (B. Williamson)

34 SWIRLING SEAS (J. Gatty)

33 SIX PACK (G. Slade)

32 MATINEE IDOL (M. Hamblen) 32 PERFECTA (M. Dunn)

32 SPACELAB (D. Saxton)

30 APRICOT FANTASY (W. Simon)

30 CHARMED LIFE (K. Keppel) 30 CURIOUS YELLOW (J. Durrance)

30 FURNACE CREEK (W. Maryott)

29 BRONZE SCULPTURE (G. Gaddie)

29 SOCIAL REGISTER (J. Ghio) 29 TOASTMASTER (J. Ghio)

28 GAY MYSTIQUE (R. Dunn)

28 RED REWARD (S. Stevens) 27 MELISSA SUE (B. Hamner) 27 RAGTIME (M. Hamblen)

26 AMBROSIA DELIGHT (D. Niswonger)

26 APACHE ROSE (D. Meek)

26 GLISTENING ICICLE (W. Maryott)

26 SHEPHERD’S HEY (C. Helsley)

26 SUGARTIME (D. Meek)

25 TOWERING INFERNO (P. Black)

13

INTERMEDIATE BEARDED 100 LITTLE SNOW LEMON (G. Gaddie)

32 HAT TRICK (P. Black)

29 PENNYWORTH (A. Ensminger)

22 CAT’S MEOW (C. Palmer)

21 BLUSHES (G. Shoop)

21 MOON SPARKLE (A. & D. Willott)

20 GLEE CLUB (J. Ritchie)

19 PAINTED HILLS (C. Palmer) 18 CARACAL (A. & D. Willott) 16 HILLS OF LAFAYETTE (C. Boswell)

16 POETIC ART (C. Palmer)

16 RED CHIPS (C. Palmer)

STANDARD DWARF BEARDED

47 LITTLE ANNIE (D. Niswonger) 34 RITA KINSELLA (H. Briscoe) 27 CHERRY POP (B. Hager)

24 PECAN SPOT (P Black)

22 COALBUCKET (S. Innerst)

19 ROYAL SPARKS (G. Gaddie) 16 HAPPY EASTER (G. Gaddie) 15 BRUSK (S. Innerst)

15 COPS (R. Sobek)

15 HI SAILOR (J. Gatty)

15 THIRD CHARM (J. Weiler)

MINIATURE DWARF BEARDED

34 FLEA CIRCUS (B. Hager)

17 BLACK KITTEN (H. Hite)

17 FLAKES (D. Sindt)

17 TOYLAND (A. & D. Willott)

16 DUNLIN (J. D. Taylor by Sindt) 16 MINI COQUETTE (B. Hager) 15 BUZZ BEE (R. &L. Miller)

15 FAR AND WEE (D. Sindt)

15 SPARKY (T. Aitken)

MINIATURE TALL BEARDED

139 AACHEN ELF (L. Kennedy)

43 SPARKLING CHABLIS (D. Guild)

39 GRANDPA’S GIRL (K. Fisher) 33 ECHO POND (D. Sindt)

29 HERE’S LUCY (D. Guild)

25 VELVET BOUQUET (T. Varner) 23 SATIN BLUE (T. Varner)

19 MAYA MELODY (A. Machulak)

18 SAND PRINCESS (K. Fisher) 16 OSHEL BLUE (M. Dunderman) 16 STRIKING GOLD (D. Guild)

13 CHATTER LINE (H. Rowlan)

BORDER BEARDED

78 BORDERLINE (J. Ghio)

38 MUSIC BOX DANCER (E. Roderick)

37 CUDDLES (D. Meek)

36 CLASSIC TREASURE (E. Burger)

33 FIDDLER (H. Stahly)

33 SHOW ME (J. Gibson)

31 CELESTIAL DREAM (J. Stadler)

29 HONKY TONK (D. Meek)

27 KIRSCH (J. Burch)

26 BUBBLING BALLET (S. Stevens)

25 PICCOLO PETE (F. Spahn)

21 PINCH OF SPICE (W. Moores) 18 ECLECTIC (W. Maryott)

16 HEY CHARLIE (P Williams)

16 PEACH REPRISE (W. Moores) 15 FRIDAY SURPRISE (G. Shoop)

14

ARILBRED

29 GREEN EYED SHEBA (C. Boswell)

16 RUFFLED SHAMROCK (J. Wight)

16 SUNDORA (F. Gadd)

12 SHABOO (F. Gadd)

11 OPALS FOR ETHEL (S. McAllister)

ARIL

15 TURKISH FEZ (B. Hager)

13 PRO NEWS (H. Danielson)

12 SANDY DANDY (H. Danielson)

SPURIA 60 JANICE CHESNIK (E. McCown)

54 IMPERIAL SUN (E. McCown) 37 BORDER TOWN (J. Ghio)

35 DESTINATION (B. Hager)

22 ARTS ALIVE (B. Hager)

22 DUSTY TRAILS (F. Wickenkamp)

20 RUSSIAN WHITE (D. Niswonger)

20 SPICED TEA (D. Niswonger) 18 EVENING DRESS (J. Ghio)

13 EURASIA (J. Ghio)

10 BLUE BUNTING

(D. Niswonger)

AZURE GEM

SIRERIAN

34 DUTCH (S. Varner)

32 LAUGHING BROOK (K. Waite)

27 APPALOOSA BLUE (L. Bellagamba)

24 SAILOR’S HORNPIPE (C. Helsley)

22 SAIL-PLANE (J. Ennenga)

19 PRESIDENT TRUMAN (L. Bellagamba)

19 SEA CHANTY (C. Helsley)

15 MARSHMALLOW FROSTING (C. McEwen)

LOUISIANA

26 DELTA FOX (M. Dunn)

24 ELUSIVE BUTTERFLY (J. Ghio)

21 C’EST CHIC (M. Dunn)

21 SUNNY EPISODE (H. Rowlan) 15 GENTLEMAN (M. Dunn)

CALIFORNICAE

21 GO WILD (J. Ghio)

10 WISH FULFILLMENT (J. Ghio) 19 BIG MONEY (J. Ghio)

18 MONTARA (J. Ghio)

17 LAS OLAS (J. Ghio)

14LOMA PR I ETA (J. Ghio)

13 GRAND DESIGN (J. Ghio)

10 RUSTIC CANYON (T. Abell)

DITTO

15

Petermeier Garden

GOLDEN

STATE

REUNION

San Jose, 1986

Ronn Dunn, Montana

Attending my first AIS Convention involved far more than merely sending reservations, securing leave from work, and packing. It was hours spent re¬ reading the convention schedule, thinking about the gardens to be visited, and wondering if it was worth the time, money and effort. Always there were questions such as, “What if their bloom season is way past peak and there are no irises to be seen? What are my responsibilities as a newly-elected RVP? If I am not impressed with the convention, what do I report to my local society and region when I get back?”

Arriving in San Jose (Wow! the plane descended quickly . . . ) with two friends from the Missoula Iris Society, we three had the “Well, we’re here!” feeling. The months of anticipation were about to come true. Other than the minor frustrations of checking into the hotel (my room was ready, their wasn’t), everything went smoothly. Iris Nelson and the Region 14 crew had our regis¬ tration packets ready. Ken and RoseMary, my Missoula friends, headed off for the Filoli tour and I attended my first AIS Board Meeting. Ron Mullin and the rest of the AIS Board had their homework done. The meeting did not have you sitting on the edge of your seat, but it was evident that AIS was in good hands. Thus, I received my first introduction to an AIS Convention.

The next three days were spent in a whirlwind of activities such as garden tours, meetings, judges’ training, and section functions. Some of my impres¬ sions:

Garden Tours: these ranged from “WOW” to “Why did we stop here?” Never having seen a large and I do mean large commercial planting such as Melrose Gradens, I was overwhelmed. Acres and acres! I was also impressed and sometimes disappointed with the guest irises. Thoughts ranged from, “Is that what I bought that didn’t bloom last year?” to “I’m glad I did get that one” to “I need this one.”

Sue Coleman’s garden was especially interesting because of the pacificas and arilbreds. I had never experienced pacifica bloom before, and what a delightful combination of form, color and pattern. Joe Gnio’s Bay View Gar¬ dens showed me that you only have to leave one foot of walking space

17

between your rows. (Just kidding, Joe!) Irises here and in other gardens were impressive and well grown. I enjoyed my introduction to louisiana irises here.

The Dabel plantings, “zoo,” and general good feeling were excellent. Well done, and thank you for opening your garden for us. Perhaps my favorite garden was that of the Petermeier family. It was well groomed, well grown, and showed what an average iris grower can do with their garden.

The People Attending Convention: I met a lot of interesting and fun people. I learned that even Joe Ghio is capable of breaking off the terminal bloom in transporting irises to a show. I am looking forward to renewing the friendships formed in San Jose.

Another group of “super” people were Jim McWhirter and his bus crew. The bus, Love Magic Go Around, was indeed a “wayward bus.” Thank you, Jim, and bus driver Kevin.

Iris Nelson, Jean Erickson, and Region 1 4 did well. San Jose was well worth the time, money and effort. They left me with the feeling, “Fiesta Phoenix ‘87, Here I Come!”

Carl Boro and Hal Mattos Man the Registration Desk

18

Melrose Gardens Perry Dyer, Oklahoma

Tall bearded bloom at Melrose was somewhat past peak for the Golden State Reunion, but there was still far more than anyone could possibly see during the allotted two hours in this garden. The adverse weather of early spring in California (namely, heavy rains that produced devastating floods in many areas) had had some impact on the bloom specifically in the intensity and smoothness of color. But the expertise used in growing the plants was very apparent.

One cannot fairly describe the impact a row of EDITH WOLFORD (Hager ’86) in full bloom has on the soul. Some irisarians just do not care for the color combination (canary yellow standards, sparkling almost-blue falls), but enough liked it so well that it won the President’s Cup. The width of the petals, the superb branching, and the clean vigorous plants make this variety a breakthrough in this color pattern. But the elegant ruffling and the overall smoothness of effect make it a landmark in irisdom.

The surprise at Melrose was the “freebie” for this year from Hager, FRA¬ GRANT LILAC. With the exception of MARY FRANCES, this general color range tends to be overlooked by irisarians. Many superb varieties (such as Julander’s MELODY RIPPLES and Parker’s LILAC FANTASTIC) have been ignored. FRAGRANT LILAC appears to be the crowning achievement of a very fine Hager line, and it has the consistent growth habits and bloom/ increase ratio that, frankly, the others in the line lacked. The ultimate in form in a tall bearded iris: swirling standards and wide, nearly horizontal falls with perfectly distributed ruffling.

19

We viewed the very last bloom of RED LION (Hager ’86) and could see the potential as an advancement in the class, notably with its strong, well- branched stalks and decent vigor. It will be interesting to see the intensity of the red in the Midwest, as our soils tend to have a richer mineral content, producing much more vibrant reds than on the West Coast.

Hager has four very fine introductions scheduled for release in 1987. MAGIC is his first contribution to the blue-bearded pink breeding that is being done. It tends to be a litle “muddy” upon first opening, as is true with most of the rich blue-pinks. The color contrast between the flower and the blue beards is stronger than the very elegant SOPHISTICATION (Hamblen ’84). But they are really different enough that both should be grown.

VERISMO is a clean, full-blown red-brown with copper shadings at the smooth-hafted shoulders. A clean copper beard complements the color harmony. Beautiful swirling standards, with good substance and excellent plant habits.

I found MY VALENTINE to be a very nice attempt at a pink-bearded white (don’t know if that was the goal, but that’s what he got!). Huge overlapping falls are almost too wide. Yet, in spite of that and heavy lace, the flowers appear to have no trouble opening properly on the sturdy stalks with three well-spaced branches. ELEGANT ANSWER is Ben’s best offering of the peachy pinks. Again, the emphasis is on the huge blocky form, yet the flowers retain a very feminine look.

BUBBLING OVER (Ghio ’82) looked superb in all the California gardens. It had better color and somewhat better form and bud count than it does in the Midwest. Although several stalks had three open at once, the timing/spacing of the stalks in the clump were sequenced so well that it produced a good garden effect also, in addition to show stalk potential. BUBBLY MOOD (Ghio ’84) is a cold icy white with the same, almost decadent, ruffling as BUBBLING OVER, but on a much broader flower. It has the vigor that BUBBLE BATH (Ghio ’82) lacked. Overall, BUBBLY MOOD is one of the best whites on the market today in a surprisingly limited color class of irises.

Sterling Innerst (Pennsylvania) is one of our finer, most innovative hybridizers today, and his releases are finally getting some attention, as was evidenced by his COLORTART (’83) coming in First Runnerup for the Cook Cup. COLORTART is a tall, festive affair done in basic yellow ground, but heavily stitched, stippled, sanded, and washed in a brilliant red/magenta/ wine. One will not miss it on the show bench or in the garden. The branching and height in this color pattern of plicata is commendable. CODICIL (’85), which made its debut at the Indy Convention last year, again looked very stunning with smooth light blue flowers accented by huge, inky blue beards the deepest beards in the class. Unfortunately, as a typical EVE¬ NING ECHO child, the branches are close to the stalk, but the branch flowers open properly. STERLING BLUSH (’82) is noteworthy for its tight, compact form and clearness of the pink saturation. Branching is very good, on grace¬ ful stalks, but bud count is somewhat shy (although the substance is so fine that the flowers usually last an extra day). EMBELLISHMENT (’86) has a little

20

more of a peach influence in its pink, but the bud count and vigor are definitely improved. Both varieties are heavily laced, yet seem to open prop¬ erly without twisting or “getting stuck” in the bud.

SYNCOPATION (Gatty ’84) is a fine improvement in the variegata class, with deep gold standards and falls that are blended violet and red with a taffeta sheen that produces a “changeable silk” effect that has become somewhat rare in modern irises. The major improvement is that SYNCOPATION’s stalks are tall, with three well-spaced candelabra branches.

The richness and newness of color in MULLED WINE (Keppel ’82) again attracted much attention. The number of branches and bud count are low, and the vigor is somewhat suspect, but one cannot fault the form and richness of color. Fortunately, it is already proving to be an important parent, as was evidenced by the new release across town, EVER AFTER (Keppel ’86), which has all the buds and vigor that its parent lacks.

GOLDEN DYNASTY (Bob Brown ’84) is a brilliant smooth gold with an absolute absence of the white that so often plagues this color class due to blood line or sunbleaching. The swirled standards were almost conical, and the wide falls were horizontal, nearly touching at the haft. Perhaps the dif¬ ferent lineage will continue to produce smoother, more brilliant golds than currently available.

Another pleasant surprise, and a major advancement in breeding, was FIEAVEN’S SHORE (Gaddie ’86), seen at Melrose under Seedling # 8-1 . This child of CHARISMA retained its parent’s excellent plant habits and branching, but is much bluer and more smoothly, heavily laced.

Steve Stevens’ reds again stopped the crowd dead in their tracks. This year, in spite of a fine showing by CLEARFIRE (’81) and RED REWARD (’83), his new HEAT PUMP wins the prize for overall quality. It is even better branched than CLEARFIRE, and has a broader, more refined flower. Even in California soil, the color of the red was intense, and the finish looked as though the flower had the gloss of a model’s high-fashion nail polish. A few feet away, and creating as much of a stir in its own way, was ZINGER (Stevens ’86), a subtle but exciting blending of violets and tans with heavy ruffling, moderate lace, and a blocky form. It reminded me of an improved, more subtle BACCARAT (Gaulter ’67), which was always one of my favorites.

Melba Hamblen’s ROSECRAFT (’86) was impressive as a rather muted version of her brilliant, very fine EXTRAVAGANT (’83). Wide, laced blossoms were well presented on shorter, thick stalks with two to three well-spaced branches.

Ah, Manley Osborne, look what you and your SKY HOOKS (’80) have done to the iris world! Even the “snobs” are paying attention now to the “Space Age” hybrids. The best of many nice ones viewed were from Monty Byers, a new hybridizer from Northern California. His first introduction, BLOWTORCH (’86) could be described as an improved, lighter version of SKY HOOKS. SILVER SPOONS (’87?), so very well named, is the finest, a smooth light blue with wide form expected of an ’80’s introduction, and huge, wild, well-shaped, consistent flounces in exactly the same color as the flower. If Moonshine

21

Monty continues to use the same highly critical selection standards that Manley Osborne has practiced, I predict the advancement in this area of hybridizing will skyrocket. Byers’ C91 -7 was one of the finer numbered seed¬ lings seen at Melrose an improved GRAND WALTZ type, slightly deeper, with incredible form, branching, and bud count. Note that this seedling was “non-adorned.”

WARRIOR KING (Schreiner ’85) was almost through blooming, but still showed the potential for being the finest of many wonderful Schreiner reds. We in Oklahoma are grateful that it blooms earlier, for many of the reds and blacks tend to “blast” in the bud as the hot weather begins to move in towards the end of our bloom season. WARRIOR KING’S branching, bud count, and